Sunday, May 20, 2018

Tennessee Centennial Exposition, 1897

There is a goldmine of information online about the Tennessee Centennial Exposition of 1897. It took so much money and time to prepare that it happened a year after the official birthday of the state of Tennessee. 

The Fine Arts Building. Official History of the Tennessee Centennial Exposition. https://goo.gl/BSWpzr

There was an Official History of the Tennessee Centennial Exposition, published in 1898. The book of almost 500 pages it full of photos, drawings, and history. You can read the book online or download to read at your leisure. A link will be included at the bottom of the page for the book and other sources. The photos of the exposition were found at the Tennessee State Library and Archives website, at the Tennessee Virtual Archives website and at Pinterest of all places. Probably the photos on Pinterest also came from TSLA but they are not credited. The news clips were found at Newspapers.com and the name of the paper and date will be in the caption.  Enjoy looking, and then click on the links to learn more.

Tennessee State Libary and Archives. http://tnsos.org/tsla/imagesearch/

Pinterest - Donald Harris, 1897 Centennial Exposition. https://www.harrisphotography.net/

Official History of the Tennessee Centennial Exposition. https://goo.gl/BSWpzr




Pinterest - Donald Harris, 1897 Centennial Exposition. Sheet Music. https://www.harrisphotography.net/


Photos of the buildings on the Centennial grounds are easy to locate. There were building with named for states and for cities. There were buildings representing agriculture, transportation, women, and children. There were specials days for farmers, local universities, and religious groups. 



Children's Building. TEVA http://teva.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/ref/collection/Centennial/id/231
The links below will take you to more photos and information about the Tennessee Centennial Exposition of 1897.

Official History of the Tennessee Centennial Exposition. 

Tennessee State Libary and Archives. 

TEVA Tennessee Centennial Exposition Collection


Monday, May 7, 2018

Vauxhall Nashville


The Vauxhall name has disappeared from Nashville and for most people is no longer a memory. It was first used here in the 1820's taken from the famed Vauxhall Gardens in London. Nashville's Vauxhall Gardens was just south of Demonbreun Street between 9th and 8th Avenues. It was a privately owned park, containing almost three acres. It was reported in a news article that a thick forest of native trees separated the city from Vauxhall Gardens. The entire area was commonly known as Southfield and was adjacent to the city. John Decker of the firm Decker and Dyer was the proprietor of the Vauxhall Gardens. A historical marker near the old location gives credit to both men, but a lawsuit filed in Chancery Court against the two reveals that Vauxhall Gardens was the property of John Decker.  and it was here that he opened Vauxhall Gardens. John Decker came to Nashville about 1815. He was in the confectionary business and he had a music store. In 1824 he entered into a partnership with Isham Dyer, who was married to Decker's daughter Harriett. Dyer was also a confectioner and Decker continue with his music business as well. In 1825 Decker and Dyer opened a reading room in Nashville. They provided books and newspapers from around the country for the subscribing members of the reading room. The many notices in newspapers of the early 1820's, show that Decker was determined to provide amusements for Nashvillians, in the form of dancing, concerts, and political gatherings. These entertainments were held in various locations until1825, when he opened the Vauxhall Gardens. 

No images of the gardens exist but it was described in several publications;

Eastin Morris' Tennessee Gazetteer, 1834.

"Vauxhall Garden is a place of fashionable resort, and is situated in the southern border of the city, near the Franklin turnpike. Here is an ingenious circular rail-way, two hundred and sixty two yards in circumference. The cars are so constructed that persons are enabled to propel themselves at a most rapid rate, simply by turning of a crank with the hands. There is also a large assembly room, handsomely decorated; and the promenade, walks and other places of amusement and recreation, are laid off and arranged in good taste. It is owned and kept by Mr. John Decker, a gentleman who spares no pains to render his parterre acceptable to visitors."

Old Days in Nashville Tenn: Reminiscences, Miss Jane Thomas, 1897.

"A man named Decker came to Nashville and opened a confectionary-shop. He built a
residence on Cedar Street. His daughter married Mr. Dyer. Decker bought two or three acres of land in South Nashville, and built a large one-story frame house and ball-room. He had a large garden planted with flowers and shurbs. All the balls, concerts and entertainments were give at 'Vauxhall,' as his place was called. He had a railroad built around the place, where people used to ride for amusement. It was a great place of resort, such as Glendale Park was during the summer of 1885.


Nashville and her trade for 1870, Charles E. Robert, 1870.

"Vauxhall Garden was, in that day, 'the place' of public resort, where all the public dinners, political and social gatherings, etc. were held. It was kept by John Decker afterward of the firm of Decker & Dyer' and was a fashionable resort."

A lawsuit in the late 1830's and the death of John Decker in 1839 brought an end to the gardens.

***

Vauxhall Street ran from Broad Street to Vauxhall Gardens and is found on an 1833 map of Nashville. In the early 20th century the name of the street was changed to Ninth Avenue South. The property in that area was divided into building lot in the mid-1870's. Many large mansions were built along the street and it became a desired neighborhood.




Residence of E. B. Stahlman on Vauxhall Street, TSLA

Reeves Home on Vauxhall Street, TSLA
***
Dr. Price's School, 1882 building on Vauxhall Street, TSLA.


In 1880 Dr. George W. F. Price established in Nashville a college for young ladies. By 1881, locals had taken notice of the quality of the education being provided by the school. A Board of Trust was created and took charge of the school with Dr. Price remaining as President. The board purchased a tract of land on Vauxhall Street near Broadway and constructed a new building for the school. The building was four stories plus a basement. There were several parlors on the main floor, reception rooms, an infirmary, a dining hall, kitchen and a suite of apartments for the president and his family. On the second floor, there was a chapel, classrooms, music rooms, and an art department. The third and fourth floors had bedrooms for the boarding students. The school, when it opened in September 1882, had an enrollment of 100 boarding students and 150-day students. Classes ranged from kindergarten to post high school. The board soon acquired the home and lot which fronted on Broad Street and was adjacent to the school. A smaller building was erected on the back of that lot which would become the chapel. 

The 1892 building on Broad Street, TSLA. The 1882 building can be seen in the background.
By 1892 a new building had been built, fronting Broad Street. It was an imposing structure, different from other buildings in Nashville. in the interior of the building was a grand rotunda which rose from the main floor to a dome which was crowned with a skylight of cathedral glass. The school attracted students from across the United States and from Europe. 

Daily American, August 21, 1892

Dr. Price died in April of 1899 in his apartment in the school he had founded. On May 31, 1899, a commencement exercise was held at the school. The son of Dr. Price spoke and he talked about the uncertain future of the school. It was the last graduation from the Nashville College for Young Ladies. By the time fall arrived, apartments were being let in the old school building which was called Vauxhall Flats.

The Vauxhall Apartments, Library of Congress. 

***
Vanderbilt University purchased the property and for a few years, the school of dentistry was in the original 1882 school building on Vauxhall Street. Vanderbilt added an additional story to the 1882 building which changed the looks of it. The building on Broad Street became the Vauxhall Flats and eventually Vauxhall Apartments. In 1913 Vanderbilt remodeled the street level. New doors were cut and storefronts put in. The building front and west side became home to Southern Bank & Trust, McGee's Barber Shop, and Ocean Candy Co. were some of the tenants. Artist Betty Willie Newman had an art studio at the Vauxhall. Miss Elizabeth Price had a music studio there. In 1923, the Vauxhall building on Broad Street was sold. The name Vauxhall Apartments was retained. The original building on Vauxhall Street was called the Vauxhall Annex. Vanderbilt rented apartments there, until 1941, when the decision was made to demolish the building. In 1946 the site of the Vauxhall and adjoining properties were chosen for a proposed federal building. In August 1949 the Vauxhall was demolished. A photo caption under a Tennessean photo described the old building as smoke-stained and history-haunted. 



Vauxhall Apartments, ca 1945. Zepp

Much of the information for this article came from Nashville newspaper article published  from 1816 through 1950. Other sources are noted in the article.

Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Smorgasbord Nashville Style




A dictionary defines smorgasbord as a buffet of various hot and cold appetizers, salads, casserole dishes, meats, cheeses, etc. In the southern United States, the meaning leans towards home cooking. A hot bar with fried chicken, meatloaf, ham, baked fish, and vegetables cooked slowly until they are way beyond done. A cold bar with a mix of salad greens with all the toppings and a variety of dressings, ranch, Thousand Island, French, etc. Salads might include beet salad, potato salad, pasta salad, cucumber and onion salad, carrot and raisin salad. Rolls and cornbread are a must. And finally a dessert bar, with fruit cobbler, sheet cake, a variety of pie slices and fresh fruit, And always ice cream.  Makes me hungry to think about all that yummy food.

Cafeteria Style



Nashville had a long tradition of cafeteria style restaurants, where customers went through the line in front of a steam table and pointed out the food they wanted and a server put it on a plate. A good variety of meats, vegetables, salads, and desserts was offered. Shacklett's on Church St., B&W (which stood for Burrus &Webber) on 6th Ave. No., and Mitchell's on Union St. were all popular places in the 40's and 50's.

The Arrival of the Smorgasbord




In the 1960's a new style of eating was introduced to Nashville. A few restaurants began to serve food buffet style, where customers served themselves and could go back for seconds or even thirds. In 1961, the Ambassador Restaurant on West End, the Biltmore Restaurant on Franklin Rd and the Plantation Room at the Albert Pick Motel on Murfreesboro Rd were all advertising smorgasbord, all you can eat buffet menus. They often offered fancy foods, Seafood Newburgh, marinated herring in wine, spiced crab apples, and creole eggplant along with some southern favorites. By the late 1960's a few restaurants were offering a salad bar to go along with the menu entrees. In the summer of 1971, Shoney's Restaurant installed their first salad bar in the Harding Rd. location.

Country House Smorgasbord



In 1971, smorgasbord in Nashville took a new turn. Orlin and Margit Prosser moved their family to Nashville from Pennsylvania. Mr. Prosser was a WWII and Korean War vet. Margit met Orlin at an Army camp where he was stationed and she was a civilian employee.  After their military years, the family settled in Pennsylvania where they began working at a large smorgasbord restaurant. It was big, could seat 1000 people and the entire Prosser family worked there. When they came to Nashville bringing many years of experience in food service Orlin and Margit were ready to own their first business. Partnering with Kenneth Franklin and family they opened the first country cooking, all you could eat, buffet self-serve restaurant, in northeastern Davidson County.  Located at 4011 Dickerson Road the Country House was immediately popular with community residents. Word of mouth brought in folks from outside the area. The restaurant proudly advertised their "country cooking." Country House was in business until the late 1970's.

Hermitage House Smorgasbord



In 1975, the Prosser's decided to open a restaurant of their own. They located a place in Hermitage, Tennessee and opened Hermitage House in May of 1975 at 4144 Lebanon Rd. It was truly a family business with each family member having a role. Customers loved the fried chicken and apple fritters. There were many loyal customers from day one who patronized Hermitage House for many years. The Prossers became a vital part of the Hermitage Community.



After 20 successful years, the Hermitage House moved to a new location at 3131 Lebanon Road. Many customers followed the Prossers down the road to the new place. Over the years new people have discovered Hermitage House. It has been a favorite in some families for several decades now. Hermitage House is still serving food there in 2018. After more than 45 years in business, the menu has not changed a lot and the recipes are some of the ones that Orlin Prosser created years before. Mr. Prosser passed away in 2001. The family carried on, continuing to serve good home cooking.  Mrs. Prosser will celebrate her 90th birthday in November. On cold days there is a fire roaring in the fireplace. Plenty of fresh food and attentive service in the dining room. A visit makes one think of visiting grandmother's house for Sunday dinner. You can find Hermitage House on Facebook.

Melrose House Smorgasbord



Melrose House Smorgasbord was opened in 1974 at 2600 Bransford Ave. Kenneth Franklin and family, of Country House, partnered with Frank Cleaver and family to open the restaurant. Melrose House had 12 dining rooms. A menu with steak and seafood was offered as well as a southern country style smorgasbord of meats and vegetables. Melrose house had room for private parties large and small and also offered catering. It sat high on a hill above Woodlawn Cemetery. The name came from an old mansion that had stood on the site. Raymond Ligon bought the old house in 1950 and dismantled it. He built a new house on the property. It was in this newer building that Melrose House Smorgasbord opened. In April 1975 Melrose House burned. It was rebuilt and reopened later that year. In 1980 there was another fire and Melrose House closed.

Bransford House Smorgasbord



Bransford House opened in May of 1981 in the same building that had been occupied by Melrose House. Mr. and Mrs. Orlin Prosser, owner of Hermitage House and former part owners of Country House had ventured out and started Bransford House. The Prosser's redecorated with a country theme and offered country cooking at their new restaurant. Taking care of two businesses may have have been too much for the family. Though seemingly successful the Bransford House closed by the late 1980's. The Prossers turned their attention back to Hermitage House.

All of these restaurants hold good memories for many Nashvillians. Some continue adding to the memories by visiting Hermitage House on Lebanon Rd. and savoring some old Prosser family favorites.





Thursday, March 29, 2018

Maplewood Place to Maplewood Trace.

A fellow history buff asked recently about the history of the name of a street. The question was about Maplewood Trace and how it related to nearby Maplewood Lane and Maplewood Place. The answer is found in several maps from different eras.

An 1871 map of Davidson County shows the continuous path, lined in blue, of Maplewood Lane from Gallatin Road to Dickerson Road. There were zigs and zags because the road followed property lines, rather than cross private property. (below)

Map of Davidson County. Wilbur Foster. 1871


The route has changed a little but is still easily traced on a later map of Davidson County, ca. 1930. There seems to be an extra zig among the zags. (below)

Map of Davidson County. Rural Delivery Routes. Ca 1930. TSLA


On a recent Google map the old path of Maplewood Lane can be found highlighted in blue, though parts of the original road are now gone or carry a different name. Walton Lane is also highlighted. Part of Walton Lane was originally Brierville Road. Walton Lane no longer exists in the footprint of Briley Parkway. (below)

Google Maps. 2018.


Presently Maplewood Trace runs from Dickerson Road back to Maplewood High School which is located on Walton Lane. Maplewood Lane, a few blocks away starts at Saunders Avenue and continues west to an end at Ellington Parkway. Maplewood Place intersects the west side of Gallatin Road near the old Litton High School and ends at the CSX railroad property. On the following map Maplewood Trace (blue), Lane (red) and Place (green) are highlighted along the route each covers today. Walton Lane (brown), another old road in the area is also highlighted on the map. (below)

Google Maps. 2018.

Sunday, March 18, 2018

From Bowman's Hill to Katie Hill


View from Bowman's Hill - Katie Hill today. Google Image 2015
I recently read a blog post about Katie Hill. The writer was very curious about how the name came about. She had researched the spot, found that one of the property developers had a daughter named Katie and wondered if the street was named for her. Property developers sometimes name streets after family members and combined with the other street names it seems to be a high possibility that the Katie in question was the daughter of J. B. Haynie. Haynie used Katie, Lula and Bessie for street names in his Cumberland Heights subdivision. Each name represents someone in his immediate family. The name Katie Hill for the area around Fern Avenue, Katie Avenue and Brick Church Pike is new, used only in the past decade or so.  It is not found in a newspaper search until the 21st century. The hill was known in past years by a different name. From about 1850 it was called Bowman's Hill. After 1900, some referred to it as Allen's Hill. Bowman's Grove was often noted in the newspaper as a gathering place for neighborhood events. Today part of the hill has a neighborhood called Haynie's Grove, and the cedar trees are long gone.

Nashville Union and American, May 29, 1869

Republican Banner June, 24, 1875



Bowman's Grove, Republican Banner, June 24, 1875.

Joseph A. Bowman came to Nashville about 1841. He was born on July 19, 1812, in North Carolina. It is not known what brought him here but a beautiful young woman would entice him to stay. Lucy Caroline White, daughter of General William and Eliza Caroline Wharton White, grew up near Dickerson Road on the estate of her father. We don't know the story of the courtship of the couple. Joseph was a physician. Perhaps he was a friend and colleague of Lucy's brother Dr. William W. White. Joseph and Lucy were married on August 24, 1843. Rev. John W. Ogden performed the ceremony. Ogden was Lucy's stepfather, having married her mother in 1838. General William White died in 1833.

Dr. Bowman and Lucy purchased and settled on property at Dry Creek eight miles out the Dickerson Road, 1844. In 1853, a directory listing shows that Joseph is living and practicing medicine eight miles from Nashville. He had recently bough a tract of land on Dickerson Pike. Though the property fronted on Dickerson it rose upwards and covered a hill that overlooked Brick Church Pike, White's Creek Valley and the Cumberland River.

In the History of the Dickinson Road by L. C. Bell, there is a wonderful description of Dr. Bowman's property.

"To the west of the highway at this point on a lofty hill overlooking the city a handsome home was built by Dr. Joseph A. Bowman many years ago.  The spacious lawn has been subdivided and a number of smaller houses built, but the old residence still stands and the views from its many windows are still strikingly beautiful.  It seems unfortunate that Bowman Hill could not have been made a park where city dwellers might go and feast their tired eyes on the beauty of Nashville with its range of purple hills. The view is one to charm as the city unrolls like a scroll to the observer – to the east a city of homes – to the west the Parthenon, that perfect type of Grecian architecture-Vanderbilt University, - Belle Bennett Memorial, the most beautiful building ever erected to a woman by women-Peabody College - War Belmont College- the church spires point heavenward – the stately capitol crowning all, and the Cumberland River winding its way to the sea." 

Lucy White Bowman died in 1856. Joseph married again in 1864 to America Motheral of Williamson County. She died in 1869. Dr. Bowman lived in his home on Bowman's Hill until his death in 1875. He was survived by a son Joseph M. Bowman, from his second marriage. After Joseph A. Bowman died, his son slowly sold off the property.



Bowman house for rent. Nashville Union and American, April 4, 1875.


Several subdivisions were created up on the hill. Not all of them were on Bowman property. This Plat of the W. G. Bush plan shows the four subdivisions that had been created between 1890 and 1912. Also shown are the J. R. Allen tract and the J. D. Linder tract.



The first subdivision was the Weakley and Dodd Sub of Lot 17 in the Plan of Brooklyn (outlined with green), filed with the Register of Deeds April 25, 1890. The streets in the plan were Highview and Weakley. Only a part of the Cumberland Heights Plan is shown on the above plat.

The second subdivision was the J. B. Haynie Grove Plan (outlined with purple), filed with the Register of Deeds on June 24, 1890. The streets is this plan are Brick Church Pike and Fern Avenue. Only a part of the Cumberland Heights Plan is shown on the above plat.

The third subdivision was the J. B. Haynie Cumberland Heights Plan (outlined with yellow), filed December 18, 1891 with the Register of Deeds The streets on this plan were Katie, Aline, Bessie, Lelia, Lula and Brick Church Pike. Only a part of the Cumberland Heights Plan is shown on the above plat.

The fourth subdivision was the W. G. Bush Tract, (outlined with red), filed with the Register of Deeds on November 11, 1912. The streets in this plan are Highview and Katie.

Weakley and Dodd were in the real estate business. J. B. Haynie and his wife Lula were property developers, buying many tracts of land for subdividing. W. G Bush was a well known businessman. He was involved in brick making and construction, banking and other businesses.

Weakley and Dodd Sub of Lot 17 in the Plan of Brooklyn filed with the Register of Deeds April 25, 1890.

J. B. Haynie Grove Plan, filed with the Register of Deeds on June 24, 1890.


J. B. Haynie Cumberland Heights Plan, filed December 18, 1891 with the Register of Deeds 

J. R. Allen was well known in the neighborhood. He was a county official, a magistrate for the district and had influence and power.  He was called Squire Allen by members of the community. His home was a large frame structure that stood on the hill for many years.

For many years the area on Bowman's Hill was covered with small houses. Many were lived in by working class laborers. The neighborhood was isolated and somewhat hidden from the busy roads that surround it. Today Bowman's Hill has been rediscovered and has a new name, Katie Hill, named for Katie Avenue. New homes have been built. Many are designed to take advantage of the spectacular view.






Sunday, March 11, 2018

McIntyre Floral Company


1918 Dodge Delivery Truck,  Private Collection in Possession of L. P. Center



McIntyre Floral Company had its start with Daniel McIntyre, Sr. in the late 1850's. Daniel was born in 1830 in Scotland and made his way to Davidson County by the mid-1850's.  In 1856 Daniel bought a lot on Hillsboro Pike a few miles from town and a few years later he purchased five adjoining acres.  The property was on Hillsboro Rd, about three miles from the courthouse.


1871 Foster Map of Davidson County, showing location of McIntyre property.


By 1864, Daniel was selling his produce to the public. It was a one man gardening operation and McIntyre sold vegetables and flowers from his wagon on the public square. He was soon well known for his beautiful flowers. McIntyre was sought after for his Marechal Neil and Lamarque roses. The greenhouses were located on the McIntyre property. Daniel McIntyre, Sr. died in 1903. His children carried on with the floral business in the style of McIntyre Bros.

The Tennessean, April 18, 1930

In 1912, Daniel, Jr., Thomas, Nellie, and William McIntyre incorporated as McIntyre Floral Company and purchased a house at 1502 Broadway. The house was remodeled to suit the business and a storefront was added. In 1919, the business moved the greenhouses from Hillsboro Rd to Woodcrest, just off of Nolensville Rd.

1502 Broadway, Florist's Review, Vol. 35, 1915


The McIntyre Floral Company was successful and operated for about  85 years. In 1945, the company's assets were liquidated. The greenhouses and the eight acres on which they were located were sold.  The store at 1502 Broadway was also sold. Today, the address is just west of 15th Avenue South, on the south side of Broadway and is used as a storage lot for new cars.

The Tennessean, July 8, 1945


Thursday, March 1, 2018

City Hall, Nashville, October 1860 - January 1861


I found this on my computer. Something I saved from my Metro Nashville Archives days. Rachel Shaver Gibson typed all of this.

[1]
City Hall, Nashville, October 1, 1860

An election having been held in the several Wards of the City of Nashville in pursuance of the charter on the 29th day of September, 1860, for the purpose of electing a Mayor, Eight Aldermen and Sixteen Councilmen for said City to serve for one year from this date and returns thereof having been made to the Mayor, (S. N. Hollingsworth Esq.) of said City from each of said Wards properly certified according to law; from which it appears that Richard B. Cheatham Esq. was elected Mayor of said City and the following named persons were elected Aldermen and Councilmen in their respective Wards, to wit:

            Aldermen                                                                        Councilmen
1st Ward          John M. McGinnis                              William O. Mirxey      John Hooper
2nd Ward          James C. McFerran                             James T. Bell               C.S. Thomas
3rd Ward          W. H. Horn                                         George W. Darden      William Shane
4th Ward          James M. Hinton                                 Andrew Creighton      Allen G. Hagey
5th Ward          R. J. Meigs, Jr.                                    J. B. Craighead           W.S. Cheatham
6th Ward          M. M. Brien                                        T. J. Yarbrough           A. M. Tenison
7th Ward          A. H. Hurley                                       Isaac Paul                    Henry Hill
8th Ward          Herman Cox                                        C. A. Brodie               A. A. Hatcher

Whereupon the above named persons being duly notified of their election respectively convened at the City Hall in the City of Nashville on the date above written, and undertook and accepted of the offices, to which they had been elected, and took and subscribed the following oath.  You and each of you do solemnly swear that you will faithfully and impartially execute and discharge the duties of Aldermen of the City of Nashville to the best of your knowledge and ability, and that each of you are freeholders in the wards for which you are respectively elected.

In testimony whereof, we have here unto subscribed our names.

1st Ward          {signed}  John M. McGinnis
2nd Ward          {signed}  James C. McFeran
3rd Ward          {signed}  W. H. Horn
4th Ward          {signed}  J. M. Hinton
5th Ward          {signed}  R. J. Meigs Jr.
6th Ward          {signed}  Manson M. Brien
7th Ward          {signed}  A. H. Hurley
8th Ward          {signed}  Herman Cox

[3]
City Hall, Nashville, October 1, 1860

The Aldermen elect met in the chamber in the City Hall this day at 11 O’clock A.M. and the Roll being called the following Aldermen answered to their names and were qualified by the Recorder as the law directs and took their seats to wit:

From the First Ward                                       John M. McGinnis
From the Second Ward                                   James C. McFerran
From the Third Ward                                      W. H. Horn
From the Fourth Ward                                    James M. Hinton
From the Fifth Ward                                       R. J. Meigs, Jr.
From the Sixth Ward                                      M. M. Brien
From the Seventh Ward                                  A. H. Herley
From the Eighth Ward                                    Herman Cox

Ald. Cox was, on motion called to the chair temporarily, who declared nomination for President was in order.  Ald. McGinnis nominated Ald. Horn.  Ald. Brien nominated Ald. Cox.  Result:  Horn 5, Cox 3.  Ald. Horn having received a majority of the votes cast was declared elected President of the Board of Aldermen for the ensuing Municipal Year.  Mr. Horn upon assuming the chair returned his thanks to the Board for the honor conferred upon him. 

Mr. Cox moved to adopt the present Rules of Order for the government of this Board.  The Monitor prevailed.

Mr. Cox moved to appoint a Committee to act in conjunction with a Committee from the Common Council to wait on the Mayor elect and introduce him to the convention.  Adopted.  The President appointed Messrs. Cox and Herley on Said Committee.

The Board of Aldermen then proceeded to the to the Hall of the Common Council for the purpose of meeting in convention to install the Mayor elect R. B. Cheatham Esq., into office and receiving any communication thereafter he might desire to make.
In Convention – Presdt. Horn in the chair, who declared the Convention ready for business.  The Mayor elect, R. B. Cheatham Esq., was then introduced by the committee and the oath of office being administered to him by the Recorder, he proceeded to read his Inaugural Address to the City Council, and at the conclusion of his Message he announced the Standing Committees for the ensuing year.

Finance                        Craighead, Brien, Paul
Water Works               Horn, Hill, Herley
Streets                         Hinton, Hooper, McFerran, Darden, Cheatham, Yarbrough, Hill, Hatcher
Wharf                          McGinnis, Bell, Tenison

[4]

Schools                        Brien, Bell, Shane
Fire Dept.                    Cox, Bell, Darden
Gas Dept.                    Maxey, Meigs, Broadie
Cemetery                     Hatcher, Herley, Hagey
Market House             Thomas, Hagey, Shane
Work House                McFerran, Cheatham, Craighead
Slaves                          Herley, Yarbrough, Maxey
Police                          Darden, Creighton, Horn
Springs                        Creighton, Brien, Hill
Imp. & Expen.                        Meigs, Paul, Tension
Hospital                       Broadie, Hinton, Hooper
Public Property           Paul, Cox, Creighton

The Convention on motion proceeded to the election of City Treasurer.  Joel M. Smith was nominated and elected without opposition.    

Mr. Craighead moved to adopt the present Joint Rules for the government of the two Bodies, the motion prevailed.
The Convention then adjourned and the Board of Aldermen retired to their own Rooms adjourned.

{signed} William H. Horn, pres.


City Hall, Nashville, October 9, 1860

Regular Meeting of the Board of Aldermen of the city of Nashville
Present – Messrs. McGinnis, McFerran, Horn, Hinton, Meigs, Brien, Herley, Cox.
Presdt. Horn assumed the chair and called the Board to order.
The Minutes of the previous Meeting were read, approved and signed by the President.

Reports from the Standing Committees
Mr. Brien from the Finance Committee presented the Reports of the Revenue Collector, Water Tax Collector, Recorder and Treasurer, which were severally read and received.
The Revenue Collectors Report showed collections made by him since his last of $10, 677.28 for Corporation and $2,822.72 for Schools, making a total of $13,500.00 his commissions having been deducted, with the Treasurers Receipts for the sums filed.
The Water Tax Collectors Report showed collections made by him since his last of $1,329.72, his commissions having been deducted, with the Treasurers Receipt for that sum filed.
The Recorders Report showed collections made by him in the month of September for Licenses, Privileges, Fines, etc. to be $2,356.46, commissions deducted with the Treasurers Receipt annexed to the Report.

Mr. Brien also from the Finance Committee reported they had examined the following Accounts and finding them correct, recommended that they be allowed and paid, which was unanimously concurred in by the Board.  Viz

[5]

Schools            Henry Alley                A/c      $288.12 Rec. pay’t {signed Henry Alley, by mark}
Slaves              John Denham              A/c      $5.00     Rec. pay’t
Slaves              Furman & Co.             A/c      $58.15   Rec. pay’t
Miscella           Jacob O. Wright          A/c      $81.25   Rec. pay’t
Streets             T. J. Seaberry              A/c      $14.50   Rec. pay’t
Fire                  T. J. Seaberry              A/c      $64.83    Rec. pay’t
Market House T. J. Seaberry              A/c      $4.50      Rec. pay’t
Work House    T. J. Seaberry              A/c      $6.95      Rec. pay’t
Water Works   T. J. Seaberry              A/c     $57.07    Rec. pay’t 
                                                                        $580.36

Mr. Brien presented the Account of the City Hospital for $717.72 and of the State Hospital for $697.00 which were read and allowed by the following vote. Yeas, Messrs. McGinnis, McFerran, Meigs, Herley, Cox, and Prest. Horn, 6.  Noes, Mr. Brien, 1.

Mr. McGinnis, Chm. Wharf Committee presented the Report of the Wharf Master, which was read and received.

Mr. Cox, Chm. Committee on Steam Fire Dept. presented the Report of the Chief of Fire Department, giving a statement of the working of the system since his connection with it and also the Expenditures from 7th August to 1st October 1860 and a Report of Fires and Alarms in the month of September.  The Reports were read and received.  The Bonds of John S. Dashiell, Joseph Irvin and Richard Harmon were read & received. 
Mr. Herley from the Cemetery committee presented the Report of the Sexton for the month of September, which was read and received.
The Report showed 62 Interments during the month, 48 Whites and 14 Blacks, 57 from the City and 5 from other places.

Resolution from Common Council
Mr. Craighead’s Resolution to appoint a Joint Select committee of five to report on Salaries of officers was read and concurred in and the President appointed Messrs. Cox and McFerran on Said Committee from this Board.

New Business
Mr. Brien introduced a Bill “To Regulate the Allowances of Accounts and the issuance of Corporation Checks” which was passed on three Separate Readings under a Suspension of the Rule.

Mr. Cox offered the following Resolution which was adopted. 
            Resolved by the City Council of Nashville, that the Gas Company be authorized to erect two Lamp Posts on Spruce Street the usual distance apart, between Church and Union Streets.
He then introduced a Bill “To Invest the Chief of the Fire Department with Police Power,” which was read the first time and passed, and the Rule being suspended the Bill was read the Second time and

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passed and the Rule being again suspended the bill was read the third time, when the Yeas and Nays were demanded on the passage of the first Section of the Bill with the following result.  Yeas, Messrs. McFerran, Meigs, Herley, Cox, Prest. Horn = 5.  Nays Messrs. McGinnis, Brien = 2.  The Second Section was then read the third time and passed and the Bill ordered to be transmitted to the Common Council at its next meeting.
Mr. Herley offered the following Resolution, which after being adopted, was on motion referred to the Work House Committee. 
Resolved by the City Council, That the Mayor in conjunction with the committee on Improvements and Expenditures be and they are hereby authorized and instructed to sell the Steam Boat “Sligo” or have it repaired as they in their judgment may think best.
He then offered the following Resolution which was adopted and the vote afterwards reconsidered and the Resolution referred by motion to the Spring Committee.
            Resolved by the City Council of Nashville, That the Mayor be and he is hereby authorized and instructed to appoint a Spring Keeper for the Public Spring in the 7th Ward of the City of Nashville and that the Committee repair the pump.
He also offered the following Resolution, which was adopted.
            Resolved by the City Council, That the Committee on the Water Works be and they are hereby authorized to purchase Fuel for the Water Works for the present Municipal Year.

Mr. Meigs offered the following Resolution, which was adopted.
            Resolved by the City Council, That a Committee of three consisting of one Alderman and two Common Councilmen be appointed to meet with a Committee of three, appointed by the County Court, to confer on the subject of a Pest House, and that Said Committee be instructed to report at as early a date as practicable.  The President appointed Mr. Meigs on Said Committee from this Board.

Mr. Cox offered the following Resolution, which was adopted.
            Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of Nashville, That the repairs or improvements necessary to be done upon the Alley running from Union to Deaderick Street, known as “Hog Alley” be and the same is hereby referred to the City Engineer, with instructions to report to best mode of improvement or repairs, with Specifications, Profiles, etc. to the next Meeting of this Board.
The Board then on motion adjourned till Thursday 7 P.M.

{signed} William H. Horn, Prest.

[7]

City Hall, Nashville, October 11, 1860

Adjourned Meeting of the Board of Aldermen of the City of Nashville.
Present – Messrs. McGinnis, McFerran, Horn, Hinton, Meigs, Brien, Herley, Cox.
Presdt. Horn took the chair and called the Board to order.

Mr. Cox presented and read a petition from F. R. Nichol asking permission to build an addition to his residence of wood material, in 8th Ward, which was received and prayer of same granted.

Mr. Herley presented and read a proposition from John Corbett in reference to 30 feet of ground in South Nashville, which was received and referred to the Committee on Public Property.
Mr. Cox from the Special Committee on Salaries of Officers submitted a report recommending the continuation of the Salaries as now established by Law.  Report received and concurred in.

Mr. Brien presented and read a communication from Madame St. Marc in reference to renting a room in the Howard School House which was received and referred to the School Committee.

Mr. Cox offered the following Resolutions, which were adopted.
            Resolved that the Street Committee be instructed to conclude all the existing contracts now in operation, that can be done without damage or loss to the Corporation and that all the hired hands, except, except those hired by the year be discharged so soon as possible.
            2nd, That the Street Committee be instructed to report to the Council at the next meeting as to the contracts closed, hands discharged, and work continued.
The Board then took a recess to go into Convention to elect a Recorder, City Marshall Deputies, 2nd and 3rd Clerks of the Market, City Engineer and Surveyor and City Attorney.
In Convention – Prest. Horn in the chair, who declared nominations for Recorder now in order.  Mr. Bell nominated W. A. Glenn.  Mr. Brien nominated S. N. Hollingsworth.  Result – First Ballot, Glenn = 12, Hollingsworth = 12.  Second Ballot, Glenn, 13, Hollingsworth, 10.  W. A. Glenn having received a majority of the votes cast was declared elected Recorder for the ensuing Municipal Year.
For City Marshal – Mr. Paul nominated W. M. Brown. Mr. Cheatham nominated W. H. Clemmons.  Result, Mr. Brown, 15, Clemmons, 9.  Mr. Brown having received a majority of the votes cast was declared elected City Marshal for the ensuing Municipal Year.
For Deputy Marshals – The following nominations were made, viz:  John Chumbley, J. H. Brantley, E. Cheek, J. Davis, John Fly, Conley Pinkard, John Burke, William McAlister, W. H. Wilkinson, William Calvert, A. P. Skipwith, James Patton, J. A. Larrd, R. M. Watson, F. W. Horn. 
On the first Ballot John Chumbley was elected having received 16 votes.
On the second Ballot J. H. Brantley was elected having received 14 votes.

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On the third Ballot W. H. Wilkinson having received 15 votes was elected.
For 2nd Clerk of the Market Isham Dyer was elected without opposition.
For 3rd Clerk of the Market John C. Pentecost, William Stone, Byrd Bruce, and Mr. Matteson were put in nomination and on the Second Ballot J. C. Pentecost having received a majority of the votes case was declared elected.
For City Engineer – J. H. Devereux was nominated and elected without opposition.
For City Attorney – N. D. Cross and Herman Cox were put in nomination and on the 2nd Ballot Herman Cox having received a majority of all the votes cast was declared elected.
The Convention then adjourned and the Board of Aldermen retired to their own rooms and adjourned.

{signed} William H. Horn, President



City Hall, Nashville, October 23, 1860

Regular Meeting of the Board of Aldermen of the City of Nashville.
Present – Messrs. McGinnis, McFerran, Horn, Hinton, Meigs, Hurley, Cox.
Presdt. Horn assumed the chair and called the Board to order.
The Minutes of October 9th and 11th were read and approved and signed by the President.

Reports from Standing Committees
The Reports of the Revenue Collector and Water Tax Collector were read and received.
The Revenue Collectors Report showed collections made by him since his last of $7,288.13 for Corporation purposes and $1,947.44 for School Tax, making a total of $9,235.57.  Commissions deducted, with the Treasurers Receipt for that sum filed.
The Water Tax Collectors Report showed collections made by him since his last of $1,290.40, Commissions deducted, with the Receipt of the Treasurer for that amount filed.

Reports from Special Committees
Mr. McFerran, Chm. Work House Committee to whom was referred the Resolution to have the Steam Boat Sligo repaired, reported progress and asked for further time, which was granted.
Mr. Meigs, Chm. Of the special Committee appointed to confer with a committee from the County Court upon the subject of a Pest House reported progress and asked for further time, which was granted.
Mr. Cox from the Committee on Public Property to whom was referred the proposition of John Corbett, reported progress and asked for further time, which was granted.

Mr. Meigs from the Gas Committee presented a report from that Committee showing the number of Public Lamps, the mode of lighting and extinguishing the same and referring to various other matters pertaining

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to that Department, which was read and received.

Bills and Resolutions from the Common Council
The Resolution requesting the City Attorney to give his opinion us to whether the Corporation is liable to keep up the various Turnpike Roads within the City’s limits, was read and concurred in.
The Resolution to authorize the Gas Company to erect “Lamp Post,” in Hog Alley at or near the Patriot Office, was read and amended by inserting “Gas Lamp” on motion of Mr. Herley, in place of “Lamp Post.”  Mr. Cox offered also the following Resolution as an amendment, to the same, which was adopted.
“Resolved by the City Council of Nashville, That the Committee on Gas be requested to take into consideration the important and pressing necessity of extending the Gas Pipes on Summer Street from Elm to the City Cemetery and on Cherry from Broad to the Cemetery, and also on College from the Medical College to the Howard School Building and that they report to the next Regular Meeting of the Council.”  The Resolution from the Common Council as amended was then read and concurred in.
The Petition of R. W. Burrows and Jesse Collins were then read and the prayers of the same granted.

Petitions
Mr. Meigs presented and read a Petition signed by Samuel J. Carter, Samuel E. Hare, and others in relation to the Tax on Hotels, and praying for a reduction of the same.  Received and referred to the Finance Committee.

New Business
Mr. Cox offered the following Resolution, which was adopted. 
            Resolved by the City Council of Nashville, That the prayer of the petition of Prof. Paul F. Eve presented to the City Council some time since relative to releasing the Tax on a Negro girl, Chaney be and the same is hereby granted.

Mr. Meigs introduced a Bill “To appropriate $300.00 to James E. Rains for Compiling the City Laws,” which was passed on three several Readings under a Suspension of the Rule.
He also offered the following Resolution, which was read and referred to the Water Works Committee.  Resolved by the City Council of Nashville That the Chairman of the Water Works Committee be required to have placed on Spruce Street, between Church and Cedar Streets, three fire plugs and also one at the corner of Cedar and McLemore Streets.

Mr. Cox offered the following Resolution, which was adopted.
            Resolved by the City Council of Nashville, that the Commissioner of the Sinking Fund created by an Act passed day of              1859 entitled an Act To create a Sinking Fund and the Act amended thereto be requested in pursuance of said law, to make full and ample report of the condition of said Fund and all things properly pertaining thereto

[10]

to the next Regular Meeting of the City Council.
Mr. Meigs offered the following Resolution, which was adopted.
            Resolved by the City Council of Nashville, That the chairman of the Street Committee be authorized to utter the names of Streets that are the same so that they shall not be confounded one with another.

Mr. Cox was on motion added to the Committee on Pest House.
The Mayor by a vote of the Board was sustained in the letting out of Hog Alley by contract.
The Board then on motion adjourned till the next Regular Meeting.

{signed} William H. Horn, Prest.

City Hall, Nashville, November 6, 1860

Regular Meeting of the Board of Aldermen of the City of Nashville.
Present – Messrs. Horn, Hinton, Meigs, Brien, Herley, and Cox.
Presdt. Horn assumed the chair and called the Board to order.
The Minutes of the Meeting held October 23rd were read, approved and signed by the President.

Reports from Standing Committees
Mr. Brien from the Finance Committee presented the Reports of the Revenue Collector, Water Tax Collector and Recorder, which were read and received.
The Revenue Collectors Report showed collections made by him since his last of $9,238.59 for Corporation purposes, and $2,624.55 for School Tax, making a total of $11,863.14, Commission deducted with the Treasurers Receipts for that sum filed.
The Water Tax Collectors Report showed collections made by him since his last of $1,009.10, his Commissions having been deducted with the Receipt of the Treasurer for that amount filed.
The Recorders Report showed collections made by him during the month of October for Licenses, Privileges, Fines, etc. to be $1,100.93, his Commission having been deducted with the Receipt of the Treasurer annexed to the Report.

The Report of the Second Clerk of the Market for the month of October was read and received.

Mr. Cox, Chm. Committee on Fire Dept. presented the Chiefs Report for the month of October, showing the expenditures of the Department during the month, the number of Fires, False Alarms, etc. which was read and received.

Reports from Special Committees
Mr. Brien from the Spring Committee to whom was referred the Resolution authorizing the appointment of a Well Keeper in the 7th Ward asked to be discharged from the further consideration of the subject,

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which request was granted and the Committee discharged.
Mr. Meigs Chm. Of the Committee appointed to confer with a Committee of the County Court in relation to a Pest House reported progress and asked for further time, which was granted.

Mr. Cox from the Committee to whom was referred the proposition of John Corbett, reported progress and asked for further time, which was granted.
Mr. Brien Chm. School Committee to whom was referred the Communication of Madame De St. Marcs in reference to renting a room in the Howard School House, reported verbally that it was a matter the Committee had no control over and asked to be discharged from the further consideration of the Subject.  Report received and Committee discharged.

Bills and Resolutions from the Common Council
The Resolution to raise a Joint Select committee on the opening or widening Union Street from Cherry to Summer was read and concurred in and the Resident appointed Messrs. Cox and Hinton on Said Committee from this Board.
The Petition of M. A. Price was read and the reference to a Joint Select Committee of three concurred in.  Mr. Cox was appointed on Said Committee from this Board by the President.
The Bill authorizing the erection of Gas Posts, was taken up, read the first time and passed.
The Bill making an appropriation on account of Steam Fire Engine No. 3 was taken up and passed on three Several Readings under a Suspension of the Rule.
The Resolution authorizing the Committee on Fire Department, so soon as a Lot can be procured, to have plans, Specifications and drawing prepared for an Engine House for Steam Engine No. 3, was read and concurred in.
The Bill “To repeal the Law prohibiting Shooting Galleries was taken up and read the first time and passed.

Petitions
Mr. Meigs presented and read a petition from Mary M. Wetterall asking permission to build a frame house on her lot situated at the corner of Summer and Jefferson Streets, on the South Side of Jefferson, with a view of residing there, that she may send her children to the Free Schools of the City.  Petition received and prayer of the same granted.
He also presented and read a petition signed by Turner S. Foster and others praying the City Council to open an Alley 15 feet wide from Spring Street to Union Street, in place of McLemore Street, which was closed by the Chancery Court of Davidson County.  Petition received and referred to the Street Committee.

New Business
Mr. Cox presented the Bonds of W. M. Brown, John Chumbley, W. H. Wilkinson, James H. Brantley, Isham Dyer, John C. Pentecost, and William A. Glenn, which were read and approved.

[12]

Mr. Hinton introduced a Bill “To establish Gay Street,” which was read the first time and passed, and the Rule being suspended the Bill was read the Second time and passed and the Rule being again Suspended the Bill was read the third and last time and passed.

Mr. Cox introduced a Bill “To repeal all Laws relative to Hospitals,” which was passed on three Separate readings under a Suspension of the Rule.
He also offered the following Resolution which was adopted.
Resolved by the City Council of Nashville, That the Mayor be requested to notify the owners of ground or lots situate on both sides of College Street from Spring to Broad Street, to have their pavement properly constructed and upon failure thereof that he have the same done in pursuance of law.
The Board then on motion adjourned till Thursday Evening 7 P. M.

{signed} William H. Horn, President 


City Hall, Nashville, November 8, 1860
Adjourned Meeting of the Board of Aldermen of the City of Nashville.
Present – Messrs. McGinnis, Hinton, Hurley, Brien, Cox, and Meigs.
Mr. Brien was called to the chair, in the absence of President Horn.
A Message from the Mayor, giving a Statement of the amount for which checks had been ordered to be issued and the number of permits granted to the Hospital, was read and received.

Mr. Brien from the Finance Committee submitted the Treasurers Report which was read and received.
He also from the same Committee reported the following Accounts correct as examined by the Finance Committee and recommended that they e allowed and paid which was unanimously concurred in by the Board viz:
Water Works               Burge & Swann          A/c      $37.90
Water Works               Tanksley & Cook        A/c      $50.00             {signed Tanksley & Cook}
Water Works               James Elder                 A/c      $11.00
Water Works               Ellis & Moore              A/c      $106.51
Water Works               William Lyon              A/c      $9.00
Slave                           J. W. Stout                  A/c      $5.00
Fire                              James Erwin & Son     A/c      $2.25
Fire                              J. D. March                 A/c      $50.00
Miscella                       John C. Fehos             A/c      $52.00
Miscella                       L. P. Williams             A/c      $9.00
Miscella                       Coleman & Co.           A/c      $9.50
                                                                                    $342.16

The Committee further report that they have examined the following Accounts which they find are correct and legally contracted for; and that the

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same should be allowed and appropriation made by Bill to pray the same.
Fire Dept                     John Spain                               A/c      $700.00
Fire Dept                     Dr. Drane                                A/c      $200.00
Fire Dept                     John T. S. Fall                         A/c      $24.00
Fire Dept                     M. A. Parrish & Co                 A/c      $238.96
Fire Dept                     Stone & Boyd                         A/c      $30.78
Fire Dept                     James Hoffett                         A/c      $36.00
Schools                        T. J. Seaberry & Co.                A/c      $137.10
Schools                        Van Riper Clock Co.              A/c      $1,254.00
Street                           W. W. Allens                          A/c      $65.25
Miscella                       J. O. Griffeth & Co.                A/c      $173.90
                                                                                                $2,859.99

The Committee further report[ed] that they have examined the following Accounts and recommend that they be allowed by Bill and closed by Note at Six Months.
Ellis & Moore                          Water Works                                                   $1,425.20
W. G. Bush                             Fire Dept.        Engine House No. 2                $378.76
McClure, Buck, & Co.            Fire Dept.        Engine House No. 2                $138.75
                                                                                                                        $1,942.71

In accordance with the above the Committee herewith recommend[ed] the passage of a Bill of appropriations, made a part of this report.
The Committee ask[ed] for further time on the petition of Samuel E. Hare and others referred to them.
                                                                                    All of which is respectively submitted,
James B. Craighead, Chmn.
The Bill of Appropriations reported by the Finance Committee was taken up and passed on three several Readings under a Suspension of the Rule.

The Report of the Work House Keeper for the month of October was read, received and ordered to be transmitted to the Common Council.

Unfinished Business
The Bill “To Repeal the Law prohibiting Shooting Galleries” was called up and read the Second time and passed:  The Rule being suspended the Bill was read the third time, when Mr. Cox offered the following as an Amendment, which was adopted, “Provided, that all Shooting Galleries shall be so kept as not to become a nuisance or in any way disturb the quiet and good order of the Citizens.”  The Bill as amended was then read the third time and passed.

New Business
Mr. Cox offered the following Resolution which was adopted.
            Resolved that the Fine recently imposed upon Watchman John Baugh by the Honorable Criminal Court of Davidson County be and the same is hereby ordered to be refunded to him and that the Recorder issue his check for the amount necessary and that the same be paid out of any money in the Treasury not other wise appropriated.  Ayes, Messrs. McGinnis, Meigs, Brien, Cox = 4.  Noes, Messrs. Hinton, Hurley = 2.

He also offered this following Resolution which was adopted.

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Resolved by the City Council of Nashville that the chairman of the Street Committee be requested to have the necessary culvert and drainage gutters constructed under the direction of the City Engineer, so as to relieve the premises of James Stephenson, situate at the corner of Ash & College Streets in the 7th Ward and that the same be done without delay.
The Board then on motion adjourned till the next Regular Meeting.
{signed} William H. Horn, Prest.


City Hall, Nashville, November 20, 1860
Regular Meeting of the Board of Aldermen of the City of Nashville.
Present, Messrs. McGinnis, McFerran, Horn, Meigs, Brien, Hurley, Cox.
Presdt. Horn assumed the chair and call the Board to order.
The Minutes of Meetings held November 6th and 8th were read, approved, and signed by the President.



Reports from Standing Committees
Mr. Brien from the Finance Committee presented the Reports of the Revenue Collector and Water Tax Collector, which were read and received.  The Revenue Collectors Report showed collections made by him since his last of $8,149.26 for Corporation and $2,342.03 for Schools, making a total of $10,491.29 less his commission, with the receipt of the Treasurer for that amount file.
The Water Tax Collectors Report showed collections made by him since his last of $1,403.27, less his commissions with the receipt of the Treasurer for that sum filed.

A proposition from Ellis & Moore to furnish Water Pipe to lay down on certain Streets in the City and take the water tax received from said line of pipe in payment for the same, was presented by Mr. Horn, Chm. Water Works Committee, and read and laid on the Table.

Mr. Hurley from the Cemetery Committee presented the report of the Sexton for the month of October, which was read and received.
The report shows 51 Internments during the month.  38 Whites and 13 Blacks, 45 from the City and 6 from other places.

Reports from Special Committees
Mr. McFerran Chmn. Work House Committee to whom was referred the Resolution to repair or sell the Steamer Sligo, reported that the committee had concluded to run the boat during the Winter, as she is deemed safe.  They therefore asked to be discharged from the further consideration of the subject.  Report received and the Committee discharged.

Mr. Meigs Chm. of the Pest House Committee submitted a proposition from the County Court Committee, which was read and received and then recommitted to the Committee with instructions to close the contract.

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Bills and Resolutions from the Common Council
The Petition of Hester Ann Stephens was read and the prayer of it granted.  
The following Resolutions were read and concurred in. Viz:  Resolution to place a Gas Post at the corner of High & Broad Streets.  Resolution to take the census of Free Negro population of the City.  Resolution to inquire into the cause of the scarcity of water in 2nd Ward.
The Bill “To repeal the Laws to prevent the ringing of auction Bells along the Streets” was read the first time and passed and the Rule being Suspended the Bill was read the Second time, when Mr. Cox offered an amendment to the same, which was adopted.  The Bill then as amended passed 2nd Reading.

Unfinished Business
Mr. Meigs introduced a Bill “To Define the eligibility of the Board of Education,” which was read the first time and passed.

Mr. Cox presented and read a petition from John Trenbath praying the City Council to grant him the privilege of erecting a frame dwelling house etc. on his lot in 8th Ward, which was received and prayer of same granted.

He then offered the following Resolution, which was adopted.
Resolved by the City Council of Nashville, That the City Engineer be requested and it is hereby made his duty to survey and run out the line of Front Street from Broad to Castleman Streets, giving the width of said Street, according to the survey made by Smith Criddle and that he report said survey with proper marks of corners, etc. and what lot or lots or parts of same are within the limits of said Streets or that are any obstruction to the same.

The Proposition of Ellis & Moore was on motion referred to the Water Works Committee.
The Board on motion then adjourned.

{signed} William H. Horn, Prest.

[16]


City Hall, Nashville, December 11, 1860
Regular Meeting of the Board of Aldermen of the City of Nashville.
Present – Messrs. McGinnis, McFerran, Horn, Hinton, Meigs, Brien, Hurley, Cox.
Presdt. Horn assumed the chair and called the Board to order.
The Minutes of the previous Meeting were read, approved, and signed by the President.
A Message from the Mayor transmitting a report of checks ordered to be issued since 10th November last amounting to $9,687.07; and also submitting for consideration the bid of Messrs. Coleman & Spain for building of Engine House on Vine Street and referring to various other matters pertaining to the interest of the City, was read and received.

Reports from Standing Committees
Mr. Brien from the Finance Committee presented the Reports of the Revenue Collector, Recorder, and Treasurer, which was read and received.
The Revenue Collectors Report showed collections made by him since his last of $4,452.45 for Corporation and $1,389.50 for Schools, making a total of $5,841.95, his commissions having been deducted, with the receipt of the Treasurer for that sum filed.
The Water Tax Collectors Report showed collections made by him since his last of $954.47, his commissions having been deducted with the receipt of the Treasurer for that amount filed.
The Recorders Report showed collections made by him during the month of November for Licenses, Privileges, Fines, etc of $1,229.09, his commissions having been deducted, with the Treasurers Receipt annexed to the report.

Mr. Brien also presented and read the Report of the Finance Committee for the month of December 1860, which was received and laid on Table.
“The Finance Committee tender herewith the reports of the different officers of the Corporation and report that they have examined the following Accounts and finding them correct recommend that they be allowed and paid, which was unanimously concurred in by the Board viz:
Fire Dept.        S. & W. F. Oros                      A/c      $4.15   pd.
Fire Dept.        W. D. Richards                       A/c      $28.00 pd.
Charity                        E. C. Minchin                          A/c      $3.90   pd.       {signed} Rec’d payt E.C.                                                                             
                                                                                                                                    Minchin
Police              Coleman & Co.                       A/c      $10.35 pd.
Water Works   William Simpson                     A/c      $24.40 pd.
Water Works   William Lyon                          A/c      $12.00 pd.
Water Works   A. Conley                                A/c      $6.00   pd.
Cemetery         John York & Co.                     A/c      $13.00 pd.
Slave               E. A. Herman                          A/c      $7.00   pd.
Miscella           Allen Johnson                         Ac       $2.80   pd.       {signed} Rec’d pay’t. Johs.
                                                                                                                                    Johnson          
Miscella           Toon, Nelson, & Co.               A/c      $7.00   pd.
Work House    McClure, Buck & Co.             A/c      $44.21 pd.
Market House McClure, Buck & Co.             A/c      $40.50 pd.
Wharf              James Tarpley                          A/c      $20.80 pd
                                                                                    $224.11

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The Committee further recommend[ed] the passage of an appropriation Bill made part of this report, to allow and pay certain accounts due by the Corporation.
The Committee have examined the petition of Samuel E. Hare and others relative to a reduction or abolition of the privilege tax on Hotels and return the same not thinking it advisable that the petition should be granted.  They have also examined the petition of Messrs. Mueller & Everett and report that in their opinion the prayer of the petition should not be granted, in as much as it would create a dangerous precedent, allowing circumstances to render the revenue of the city uncertain and speculative.
The have also examined the Act entitled “An Act to amend the Revenue Laws of the City.”  The Second clause or Section of which they approve of and recommend its early adoption.  The first Section the Committee considers unjust and oppressive on property owners, making them as it were tax collectors for the City and would have a tendency if made the law, to reduce the revenue by causing those, who own Halls, Theatres, etc. to cease to rent them for any purpose requiring a privilege Tax.
The Committee have examined the annual statement of John L. Glenn, Collector of Water Taxes, as made up to this date, including the return made as part of this report and find the account as follows.
John L. Glenn Water Tax Collector                                                                       Debit
To Balance, Uncollected Taxes, as per last A/c rendered                                                3,100.87
To Assessment of 1860                                                                                                    28, 408.30
To Taxes for Sprinkling Streets                                                                                       3,039.40
To Extra Taxes not listed                                                                                                 1,341.10
                                                                                                                                         35,899.67
                                                                                                                          Credit
By Cash paid in as per Treasurers Receipts                                                    26,449.09
By Commissions allowed                                                                               1,391.95
By Insolvent Debts                                                                                         1,033.40
By Unpaid Balance as per Books                                                                   7,025.23   35,899.67

The list of insolvent debts is properly attested and is filed herewith as a part of this report and your Committee offer herewith a resolution that the amount of Said debts be allowed to the credit of Mr. Glenn to balance the account.
All of which is respectfully submitted”
James B. Craighead, Chm Finance Committee
Nashville December 11, 1860

Finance Appropriation Bill for December 1860

Be it enacted by the City Council of Nashville; That the following Accounts be allowed and that money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated by Law, be and the same is hereby appropriated to pay them:
McClure, Buck, & Co.            Market House Dept.                           121.27
McClure, Buck, & Co.            Market House Dept.                           156.00
Henry Alley                            Water Works Dept.                             369.80
McGavock & Castleman         Miscella.                      Ea. $300.00     600.00
                                                                                    Amt. Over       1,247.07

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                                                This amount brought over                   1,247.07
A. C. Faris                               Market House Dept.                           111.60
Thomas M. Brennan                Water Works Dept.                             162.85
Alexander Jenkins                   Fire Dept.                                            65.10
J. M. Fraley                             Street Dept.                                         55.85
J. C. McFerran & Co.              Street Dept.                                         334.75
J. C. McFerran & Co.              Charity Dept.                                      108.40
William Simpson                     Water Works Dept.                             117.44
Ellis & Moore                          Water Works Dept.                             176.15
                                                                                                            2,379.21

Resolved by the City Council of Nashville
That the Sum of One Thousand and Thirty three 40/100 Dollars ($1,033.40) be allowed to the credit of John L. Glenn, Water Tax Collector to balance the insolvent portion of his Account as now charged against him.

Mr. Hurley from the Water Works Committee presented the report of the Superintendent of the Water Works, which was read and received.  He also presented a report from the Water Works Committee recommending an improvement in the Boilers of the Water Works, which was read and received.

Mr. Hinton Chm. Street Committee to whom was referred the petition of T. S. Foster and others in regard to opening an alley, submitted a report recommending that the prayer of the petitioners be granted.  Report received.
Mr. McGinnis Chm. Wharf Committee presented the report of the Wharf Master, which was read and received.
Mr. Cox, Chm. Committee on Fire Dept. presented the report of the Chief of Fire Dept. for the month of November, giving a Statement of the number of fires, false alarms and the expenses during the month which was read and received.

Mr. Hurley from the Cemetery Committee presented the report of the Sexton for the month of November, which was read & received.

The Report of Isham Dyer, 2nd Clerk of the Market for the month of November, was read and received.

Reports from the Special Committees
Mr. Cox from the Committee on Public Property to whom was referred the proposition of John Corbett, reported progress and asked for further time, which was granted.

Mr. Horn Chm. Water Works Committee, (Mr. Hurley being in the chair) to whom was referred the proposition of Ellis & Moore about Water Pipe reported progress and asked for further time, which was granted.

[19]

Unfinished Business
The Bill authorizing the erection of Gas Posts was taken up, read the third time and ordered to be referred to the Gas Committee.
The Bill “To amend the Act to prevent the ringing of Auction Bells etc.” was taken up and read the third time and passed.
The Bill “To define the eligibility of officers etc.” was taken up, read the second time and on motion referred to the School Committee.

Bills and Resolutions from the Common Council
The report of the Committee recommending the rejection of the petition of M. A. Price, was read and concurred in.

Petitions
Mr. Hurley presented and read a petition from J. T. Dunlap in reference to refunding taxes paid by him on his Negroes hired to the Corporation and injuries received by one of his Negroes while in the employ of the Corporation, which was received and referred to the City Attorney.

Mr. Brien presented and read a petition from Ellis & Moore in reference to the damage sustained by them in consequence of the raising of South Market Street, which was received and referred to the Committee on Improvements and Expenditures.

Mr. McGinnis presented and read a petition from the Tennessee & Alabama Rail Road Co. asking permission to erect a temporary shed to protect freight etc. which was received and the prayer granted.

Mr. Hurley presented and read a petition from R. W. Burrows in relation to running the Engine at the Water Works, which was received and laid on the table.

Mr. Cox presented and read a petition from the Trustees of the Cherry Street Baptist Church (colored) asking permission for the members of said church to hold a fair during Christmas Week for the purpose of paying for their church.  Received and laid on the table.

New Business
Mr. Cox offered the following Resolution, which was rejected.
            Resolved by the City Council of Nashville, That the prayer of the petition of the Trustees of the Cherry Street Baptist Church relative to permitting the colored Mission of said church to hold a Fair during Christmas Holidays be and the same is hereby granted.
He also introduced a Bill for the benefit of J. T. Dunlap, which was read the first time and passed.
He then offered the following Resolution, which was adopted.
            Resolved that this Board meet the Common Council in Convention on Thursday Evening next the 13th inst. At 8 O’clock P.M. for the purpose of electing a Water Tax Collector, Keeper of the Work House, Street Overseer, Superintendent of the

[20]

Water Works, Engineer and Assistant Engineer of Water Works, Sexton and such other officers as are to be elected at the 1st Regular Meeting in December of each year.

Mr. Horn (Mr. Hurley being in the chair) read a proposition from Messrs. Ellis & Moore proposing to repair the Boilers of the Water Works for the sum of $         .  He then introduced a Bill “To authorize the Water Works Committee and Mayor to improve the Boilers of the Water Works which was passed on three Several readings under a Suspension of the Rule.
He then offered the following Resolution, which was adopted.
Resolved by the City Council of Nashville that the amount necessary to pay for the repairs and improvements of the old Boilers of the Water Works be and the same is set apart from the Water rents to pay for the same.     

Mr. Brien offered the following Resolution, which was adopted.
Resolved that a Select Committee of three be appointed by the President of this Board to inquire into and report by Bill or otherwise, whether or not, the Engines at the Water Works can be run with or by one Engineer, if so, what would be a reasonable compensation therefore for a competent Engineer.  The chair appointed Messrs. Brien, Horn, & Cox on said committee

Mr. Hinton introduced a Bill “To open an alley between Spring and Union Streets,” which passed two readings under a Suspension of the Rule.

The Message of the Mayor was taken up and that portion referring to Wood Wagons on the Square read and laid on the table.

Mr. Hinton introduced a Bill “To widen Gay Street,” which was passed one three Several readings under a Suspension of the Rule.
The Resolution to allow the Water Tax Collector a credit of $1,033.40 for Insolvencies, Errors, etc. was taken up and adopted.

Mr. Meigs offered the following Resolutions, which were adopted.
            Resolved That a Standing Committee of three, consisting of one Member from the Board of Aldermen and two Members from the Common Council be appointed by the Mayor, to serve as other Standing Committees and to be called the Committee on the Pest House.
That Said Committee be authorized to enter into an agreement with the County Court relative to a Pest House, on the basis of the agreement reported by the Joint Committee, and that they be authorized to carry out the same according to said agreement and to report a Bill for

[21]

the proper management of said Pest House, carriage and treatment of Patients, and all other things, pertaining therto.
The Board then on motion adjourned until Thursday Evening 13th inst 7 P.M.
{signed} William H. Horn, P. B. A.



City Hall, Nashville, December 13, 1860
Adjourned Meeting of the Board of Aldermen of the City of Nashville.
Present – Messrs. McGinnis, McFerran, Horn, Hinton, Meigs, Brien, Hurley, Cox.
Presdt. Horn assumed the chair and called the Board to order.
Mr. Brien Chm of the Committee to whom was referred the Resolution in reference to a change of the Law as to the Engineers at the Water Works reported that they deemed any change inexpedient at the present.  Report received and concurred in.
He then offered the following Resolutions, which were adopted.
Whereas the City Council has provided transparent dials at a cost to the City of $250 and Gas pipes leading to them, at a very considerable additional cost, for the public clock upon the Tower of the Howard School House and whereas the above named outlay for dials and Gas fixtures is useless without a small further expenditure for the purpose of illuminating them for the convenience of the Citizens of Nashville
Resolved, That an arrangement be immediately made with the Gas Co. for four lights (one for each face of said clock) to burn from dark till day light of each day of the year, and for the lighting and extinguishing the same.
Mr. Hurley introduced a Bill “To authorize the Water Works Committee to let out by contract the ditching on Market Street from Castleman to Ash Street to lay down the 8 inch Pipe, which was passed on three Several Readings under a Suspension of the Rule.

Mr. Cox introduced a Bill “To authorize the erection of an Engine House on Vine Street, which was passed on two readings under a Suspension of the Rule and the rule being again Suspended the Bill was read the third time and rejected.

The amendment of the Common Council to the Bill to prevent the ringing of Auction Bells, striking out that part allowing them to ring for 15 minutes, was read and concurred in.

[22]

Mr. Cox offered the following resolution, which was rejected.
            Resolved that the Mayor in conjunction with the Committee on Fire Department be and they are hereby authorized to have constructed a temporary shed on Engine Lot on Vine Street for the purpose of placing Engine No. 3 in, until a suitable House can be erected on Said lot or Some other suitable location is made.
Mr. Brien offered the following Resolution which was adopted.
            Resolved that Engine No. 3 for the present be Stored at the Work House.
The Bill for the benefit of J. T. Dunlap was taken up and passed on 2nd and 3rd Readings under a Suspension of the Rule.

The Board then adjourned to meet the Common Council in Convention to elect certain officers.
In Convention – Prest. Horn in the chair who declared the Convention ready for business.
The following Gentlemen were nominated and elected to their respective offices for the year viz:
Water Tax Collector                            John L. Glenn
Supt. Water Works                             John M. Seaberry
1st Engineer Water Works                   John M. Reeder
2nd Engineer Water Works                  James D. Petty
Wharf Master                                      Jesse L. Dortch
Sexton Cemetery                                M. C. Cotton
Street Overseer                                   J. B. Pettit
Keeper of the Work House                 William Dix
The Convention then adjourned and the Board of Aldermen retired to their own Hall and adjourned.
{signed} William H. Horn, Prest.

[23]

City Hall, Nashville, December 25, 1860
Regular Meeting of the Board of Aldermen of the City of Nashville.
Present – Messrs. Horn, Hinton, Meigs, Brien, Hurley, and Cox.
Presdt. Horn assumed the chair and called the Board to order.
The Minutes of the previous Meeting were read, approved and signed by the President.

Reports from Standing Committees
Mr. Brien from the Finance Committee presented the Report of the Revenue Collector and Water Tax Collector, which was read and received.
He also presented a Majority Report from the Finance Committee recommending the allowance of the Accounts of Dews, Grooms, & Co. of $379.70 for work done on Hog Alley.  He also presented a Minority Report signed by himself as a Member of Said Committee adverse to the allowance of Said Account.  Report received and laid on the Table.
Unfinished Business
The Bill “To open an alley from Spring Street to Union Street” was taken up, read the third time and passed.
Bills and Resolutions from the Common Council
Mr. Creighton’s Resolution to have the Gutter on Cedar Street repaired was read and referred to the Street Committee.
The Bill “To establish and regulate a Detective Police,” was read the first time and passed.
The Petition of C. R. Green was read and the prayer of the same granted.
The Report of the Gas Committee, on the Resolution of Mr. Cox to have the Gas Pipe laid down on certain Streets, recommending that the work be done as soon as possible, was read and received.
New Business
Mr. Hinton offered the following Resolution, which was adopted.
            Resolved by the City Council of Nashville, that the Mayor in conjunction with the Street Committee are herby authorized to hire such a number of Negroes as may be deemed necessary for the use of the Corporation for the year 1861 and also for the use of the Water Works.

Mr. Brien offered the following Resolution, which was adopted.
            Resolved, That the privilege heretofore granted to Messrs. McCanor & Co. concerning the frame buildings at the corner of High and Demumbrane Streets be continued indefinitely – provided that the City reserves the right to withdraw Said privilege at any time whatever and in that went the said buildings etc. are to be removed at the cost of the owners, whoever they may be, of Said buildings.
He also introduced a Bill “To regulate the fees of the Night Police,” which was passed on two Readings under a Suspension of the Rule.

Mr. Cox offered the following Resolution, which was adopted.

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Whereas it has been made known to the Board by the Chief Engineer of the Fire Department that owing to the want of proper size and tone of the Bell in the Tower of Engine House No. 5 situated on Cherry Street and the great distance of Said Engine House from a large and populous portion of the City and therefore the failure of hearing said Bell, when alarms are given, Therefore Resolved that the Chief Engineer be and he is hereby authorized to take down and remove for the present the Bell now in the Tower of the Engine Company No. 2 of the late Volunteer Department situated on South College Street and place the same in the Tower of the house lately occupied by Engine Company No. 5 of the late Volunteer Department situated on South Cherry Street and that the same be done at as early a day as practicable.

Mr. Cox introduced a Bill “To authorize the Water Works Committee to purchase a Lathe” for the use of the City, which was passed on three Several Readings under a Suspension of the Rule.

Mr. Meigs introduced a Bill “To establish and regulate a Pest House,” which was passed on three Several Readings under a Suspension of the Rule.

The Board then, on motion, adjourned until the next Regular Meeting.
{signed} William H. Horn, P. B. A

[25]

City Hall, Nashville, January 8, 1861
Regular Meeting of the Board of Aldermen of the City of Nashville.
Present – Messrs. McGinnis, McFerran, Horn, Hinton, Meigs, Brien, Hurley, Cox.
Presdt. Horn assumed the chair and called the Board to order.
The Minutes of the previous Meeting were read and approved and signed by the President.
The following Communication from the Mayor was read and laid on the Table.
                                                                                                Mayors Office 8th January, 1861
To the City Council
                        I herewith transmit a list of checks ordered to be issued by the Mayor from 10th December 1860 to 7th January 1861 – amounting to $5,118.00.
            A communication is also submitted for your immediate action, from M. S. Stokes relative to a reward for the conviction of any person or persons for the crime of “Arson,” during the last Municipal year offered by my predecessor.
            I also transmit a communication from the “Robertson Association,” and recommend the same to your favorable consideration.  All of which is most respectfully submitted.
                                                                                                R. B. Cheatham, Mayor

The Communication from the “Robertson Association” and M. S. Stokes was read and laid on the Table.

Reports from Standing Committees
Mr. Brien from the Finance Committee presented the Reports of the Revenue Collector, Recorder and Treasurer, which were read and received.
The Revenue Collectors Report showed collections made by him since his last of $4,173.16 for Corporation and $1,250.93 for Schools, making a total of $5,424.09, his commission having been deducted with the Treasurers Receipt for that sum filed.
The Recorders Report showed collections made by him during the month of December of $1,238.20 for Licenses, Privileges, Fines, etc. less his commissions with the Treasurers Receipt annexed to the Report.

Mr. Brien also presented a Majority and Minority Report from the Finance Committee on Accounts, which were read and laid on the Table.

Mr. Hurley from the Water Works Committee presented a Report from the Superintendent of the Water Works, which was read and received.

Mr. McGinnis, Chm. Wharf Committee presented the Report of the Wharf Master, which was read and received.

Mr. Cox, Chm. of the Committee on Fire Department presented the Report of the Chief for the Month of December, which was read and received.

Mr. Meigs from the Gas Committee to whom was referred the Bill, “To erect certain Gas Posts,” reported favorably on the same and recommended the passage of the Bill.  Report received and Bill laid on the Table.

[26]

Mr. Hurley from the Cemetery Committee presented the Report of the Sexton for the month of December, which was read and received.
The Report of Isham Dyer 2nd Clerk of the Market for the month of December, was read and received.
Mr. Meigs, Chm. of the Committee on Improvements and Expenditures to whom was referred the petition of Ellis & Moore asking for damages on account of raising So. Market Street reported that the Committee felt reluctant to pass upon the petition and therefore recommend the rejection of its prayer in the amount set forth and asked to be released.  Report received.

Unfinished Business
The petition of M. S. Stokes was taken up and on motion referred to a Special Committee of three, consisting of Messrs. Hinton, Brien, Meigs.
The Report of the Committee on Improvements and Expenditures was called up, read and after some discussion concurred in.
The Bill “To regulate the Salaries of the Night Police” was taken up and read the third time and rejected by the following vote, Ayes, Messrs. Brien, Hurley, 2.  Noes, Messrs. McGinnis, Hinton, Meigs, Cox, Prest. Horn = 5.
The Bill “To define the eligibility of officers etc.” was read the second time and passed.
The Bill “To erect Gas Posts,” was read the third time and passed.
The Bill “To establish and regulate a Detective Police,” was passed on the 2nd and 3rd Readings under a Suspension of the Rule.

Bills Etc. From the Common Council
The Bill “To reduce the Tax on Runners for Hotels etc.” was read the first time and passed.
The following bills were read the first time and passed viz:  “The Bill to amend the Revenue Laws.”  The Bill, “To amend the Act of September 10, 1857.”  The Bill “To provide and regulate the School Fund.
The Resolution “To instruct the City Engineer to survey and make plots of the City property was read and concurred in.
The Report of the Hospital Committee was read and received.

New Business
Mr. Hurley introduced a Bill for the benefit of the Robertson Association,  which was read the first time and passed, and the Rule being suspended, the Bill was read the 2nd time, when the blank was filled with $500.00 and the Bill passed.  The Rule being again suspended the Bill was read the third time and passed.

Mr. McGinnis offered the following Resolution, which was adopted.
            Resolved by the City Council of Nashville, That the Mayor be and is hereby authorized to rent the Allisons Wharf for the present year to be used for purposes as heretofore.
Mr. Hinton introduced a Bill “To compensate Ellis & Moore for damages, etc.” which was read the first time and passed.
He also introduced a Bill “To provide for the erection of a Railing on Market Street, which was read the first time and passed.

[27]

Mr. Cox introduced a Bill “To provide for the better regulation of Street Grades and Pavements,” which was read the first time and passed.
He also offered the following Resolution, which was adopted.
Resolved, That the Recorder be authorized to purchase the necessary Stationary, Pens, Inks, etc for the use of the City Offices and the City Council, and to have such Blanks printed for the City as may be required.
He also offered the following Resolution, which was adopted.
Whereas no satisfactory report has during the last two months or more been made to this Board or to the City Council of the management of the City Work House and it being very desirable to have said report made full and particular, Therefore, Resolved by the City Council of Nashville, That the Committee on Work House make such report as may be in their power giving in full and complete detail all matters pertaining to said institution and particularly the Account presented in the report of the Finance Committee for the present Month.
He likewise offered the following Resolution, which was adopted.
Resolved that the survey as reported by the City Engineer of Front Street from Broad to Castleman Street be and the same is hereby referred to a Committee of three from this Board with instructions to report by Bill or otherwise at the next Regular Meeting of the Board.  Committee Messrs. Hinton, Hurley, Cox.
He also offered the following Resolution, which was adopted.
Resolved That the President and Directors of the Tennessee and Alabama Rail Road Company be and they are hereby authorized, Provided they can procure the same to be done at their order, to have the necessary Gas pipe laid and proper Lamp Posts established at their Depot on Broad Street in the City, so as to afford sufficient light to said Depot and that the Gas consumed by the same be paid for as other Gas Posts in the City out of the City Treasury.
The Board then on motion adjourned till Thursday Evening 7 P. M.
{signed} William H. Horn, P. B.A.

[28]

City Hall, Nashville January 10, 1861
Adjourned Meeting of the Board of Aldermen of the City of Nashville.
Present – Messrs. McGinnis, McFerran, Horn, Hinton, Meigs, Brien, Hurley, Cox.
Presdt. Horn took the chair and called the Board to order.
Mr. Hurley read a communication from J. M. Reeder in reference to the repair on the Boilers of the Water Works.  Received.
A Communication was received from the Common Council stating that they were ready to receive this Board for the purpose of electing City Assessor, and Captain and Lieutenants and Night Police.
In Convention – Prest. Horn in the chair, who declared the Convention ready for business.
For Tax Assessor – Thomas J. Haile and Liston Stones were put in nomination.
Result – Haile = 19.  Stones = 5.  Mr. Haile was declared elected Tax Assessor for the ensuing year.

For Captain of the Night Watch – W. H. Sturdivant, George Sweeney, T. W. Chetton, and John Baugh were put in nomination.  Result – Sturdivant – 6, Sweeney – 3, Baugh – 15.  John Baugh was declared duly elected Captain of the Night Watch for the ensuing twelve months.

For 1st Lieut. Night Watch – W. E. McAlister and W. H. Sturdivant were put in nomination and on the 2nd Ballot, Mr. Sturdivant having received a majority of the votes cast was declared elected.

For 2nd Lieut. Night Watch – R. M. Caritt, W. W. Calvert, R. S. Patterson, and W. E. McAlister were put in nomination and on the 5th Ballot, Mr. Patterson having received a majority of all the votes cast was declared elected.  Mr. McAlister’s name having been withdrawn on 2nd Ballot.

For Night Police – The following persons were elected to serve for the ensuing twelve months, vix:  R. M. Caritt, W. H. Craft, W. W. Calvert, William Jackson, Joel S. Philips, S. J. Starkey, A. C. Tucker, R. M. Watson, W. Yarbrough, John Arnold, John Cotrell, John Cavender, William Long, W. E. McAlister, Augustus Thomas, W. B. Heron, Tip Vivaette.
The Convention then adjourned and the Board of Aldermen retired to their own Hall and adjourned till Monday 14th inst at 7 O’clock P. M.
{signed} William H. Horn, P. B. A.

[29] 

City Hall, Nashville January 14, 1861